A Brief History Of Scrapple

Discussion in 'The Drivers Lounge' started by slavenomore, Aug 21, 2017.

  1. slavenomore

    slavenomore US Gov Hears Foreign Corps More Than Nonunions

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    http://lehighvalleygoodtaste.com/restaurant/brief-history-scrapple

    We got this in the mail..I got a kick out of it because it's a PA local type food...

    Maybe somebody can send a link to jimmyg cause he has me on ignore...he'd probably get a kick out of it too.

    A Brief History of Scrapple
    by Cezanne Colvin

    I was 21, I had recently spilled both coffee and orange juice on my shirt, and the man sitting in front of me thought I was an idiot.

    It was 11 a.m. on a Sunday, and the brunch and leisure crowd was out in full force. I, sadly, was not brunching. I was working as a waitress, and the man had just asked me if the restaurant carried scrapple. Did he mean Snapple? Having grown up on the West Coast, I had never heard of scrapple. I asked him what he meant, and he exchanged a look with his dining companion before returning his gaze to me.

    “You know. Scrapple. Hello?” he had said.

    No, I did not know.

    In fact, I still don’t.

    Scrapple is, apparently, integral to the Pennsylvania Dutch cuisine, identity, and lexicon. It has since been described to me as “meat mush,” “good—if you don’t know what’s in it,” and “better than bacon.” Upon further research, the word “congealed” came up in several queries. It also goes by the Pennsylvania Dutch name Pannhaas, or “pan rabbit.” A rural pâté, scrapple has been found on the haute plate at New York City restaurateur’s Ivan Orkin’s ramen eatery in the form of a waffle, which food critic Robert Sietsema called “one of the best dishes of the year” in 2014. It also commonly graces the menu of Pennsylvania’s greasy spoons, having earned the status of a controversial delicacy. Ten out of 10 heart surgeons do not recommend it, and I was even hard-pressed to find a native Pennsylvanian who did. (When I inquired about the offal delight, I was mostly met with looks of concern and the occasional sigh.) Continued....

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    Last edited: Aug 21, 2017
  2. pro1driver

    pro1driver I am LAST

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    i actually had scrapple a time or two, but it was not in the shape of a patty, but rather looked like hash browns?

    it wasn't all that bad. many times even with my eggs, i put a small "dap" of ketchup on the scrapple or even the corned beef hash.

    i could care less (i think) the ingredients. i was once told it is nearly all the left over meat from a pig, which we all know, on a farm, practically nothing goes to waste for food.
     
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  3. pro1driver

    pro1driver I am LAST

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    in fact, i think my local Aldi store has that, and i may have bought a can or two there as well.

    usually located at the chili, corned beef and hash end section
     
  4. ABFer

    ABFer Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Scrapple is good with syrup on it too, like with pancakes, waffles and french toast. I hate people who answer questions with questions but when it comes to scrapple I'm guilty. When people ask, "Eww you eat that?", I ask, "Do you eat hot dogs?" Meat ingredients are about the same, the difference is in the other ingredients.
     
  5. pro1driver

    pro1driver I am LAST

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    isn't that called..."mystery meat"...??????
     
  6. Jeff

    Jeff Administrator

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    I like scrapple ... Like Liver Pudding better but I still like Scrapple too
     
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  7. SuperCourse

    SuperCourse Well-Known Member

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  8. seabreeze

    seabreeze Not Well Known Member, 60 Year Teamster Member

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    I remember years ago, going into a small Ga. restaurant that had on the menu, today,s special "beef tongue"
    I told the waitress, I am not about to eat anything that came from an animal's mouth.
    She said whats your pleasure? Told her, just bring me a couple eggs.
     
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  9. ABFer

    ABFer Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Years ago I used to see cow's tongue and even brains in the meat bunker, not anymore. Another 'delicacy' is stuffed pig's stomach. The stuff they stuff it with sounds pretty good but I think that stomach thing is one of those things that you need to be fed before you know how to talk in order for you to eat it later.
     
  10. seabreeze

    seabreeze Not Well Known Member, 60 Year Teamster Member

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    Brains and eggs is a southern thing for the brave, but tasty, fish roe and eggs also.
    Don't know about the pig's belly, beef stomach is stringy and tough but also tasty if you're a gambler.
     
  11. slavenomore

    slavenomore US Gov Hears Foreign Corps More Than Nonunions

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    I had the tongue before......that one I did not like.....the texture and all was just not right...yuk.
     
  12. slavenomore

    slavenomore US Gov Hears Foreign Corps More Than Nonunions

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    Did somebody mail that to Maine?
     
  13. Fly-by-night

    Fly-by-night Only when you care to send the very best

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    My grandfather made srapple. He made his using deer meat. As a kid every year after we butchered our deer he would take the bone and other part and boil the meat off and make his famous scrapple. I sure miss it. RIP
     
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  14. ABFer

    ABFer Super Moderator Staff Member

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    He has friends at Doggie Pyle...he trades lobstahs and steemahs for scrapple and fordhook limas.
    I'd like to try that. There's a store here that makes buffalo scrapple and it's pretty tasty too.
     
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  15. slavenomore

    slavenomore US Gov Hears Foreign Corps More Than Nonunions

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    Emphasis on"famous"...LOL....that's why I posted this....the old timers where I work sometimes stood around talking about how they made the stuff in cutoff 55 gallon drums on a fire...and stir it with big sticks or something....They ALL had famous recipes.LOL.,,,farmers...
     
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  16. Fly-by-night

    Fly-by-night Only when you care to send the very best

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    My father who retried about 5 yrs ago remembers getting plumbing in his house and plowed the fields with horses that's are the late 40s early 50s. I know as a kid he use to tell use the kitchen stove that was wood burning was the only heat in the house and its only cold when the frost is on the inside of the windows
     
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