B-Trains vs Doubles

Discussion in 'The Drivers Lounge' started by MikeJ, Apr 16, 2015.

  1. MikeJ

    MikeJ Well-Known Member

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    Hey guys,
    Why does Canada run B-Trains and we here in the states run doubles?
    To me B-Trains kind of look like a nice stable combination. The only B-Trains I have ever seen here in Cleveland are some steel haulers like Valley Transport from Ashland, Ohio.

    However in Canada you see like GFS Canada, Tim Hortons, all running B-Train doubles.
     
  2. Doubleclutcher

    Doubleclutcher Romper Room Moniter

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    The main reasons are heavier loads, more payload space and stability. They can gross up to #140000 or more on a set of B trains with the right axle groupings. They are also a hell of a lot easier to back up then a set of A trains.
     
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  3. johndeere4020

    johndeere4020 Well-Known Member

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    They run B-trains out west, some of those states you can tag 105,500.
     
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  4. ABFer

    ABFer Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Michigan allows 11 axle trucks. Single trailers with a lot of rubber and the A and B trains (one has the fifth wheel permanently attached and the other uses a double axle converter gear if I remember correctly). Last I knew of they were not allowed in any surrounding states.
     
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  5. MikeJ

    MikeJ Well-Known Member

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    Besides in construction heavy haul and once and I mean once in a blue moon in steel I rarely ever see tri axle trailers here in the states. I have seen the Michigan Super Trucks. Yeah the B trains have the fifth wheel permanently attached and I think like in Canada they detach the back trailer and then the fifth wheel can slid up under the trailer.

    B-Trains are pretty cool and they look like a real stable set up with that fifth wheel being permanently attached.
     
  6. Northern Flash

    Northern Flash Piss on our Flag, get a boycott against you.

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    In Michigan, with the proper axle spacing, you can gross 164,500 lbs. I pulled an "A" train, "B" train, and standard doubles for years.
    An "A" train has two hitches on the back of a three axle lead trailer, (spaced about 5 ft. apart) which stops any whipping action. The two hitches are attaching a two axle dolly with a fifth wheel on it. The dolly can float up and down with rough terrain, but backs under the pup really easy, since it doesn't have the extra joint.(or pivot point)

    A "B" train has a permanent fifth wheel on the back of a five axle lead and the dolly cannot "float" since the lead is all one solid frame with five axles under it. The fifth wheel is mounted over top of the back two axles on this five axle lead trailer. It backs easily under the pup also.

    A stand set of doubles has a three axle tractor, three axle lead trailer, and a five axle pup.

    11 axles is the most that you can have without a special permit. And when the front axle on each trailer is a 9 foot spread distance from the next closest axle, it adds 5,000 more pounds to your GVW. Which jacks your gross up to 164,500, with a big, wide front steer tire. We called them a "bologna" (ballony) steer tire.

    I pulled these at 18 years old. This is a standard "gravel train".
    [​IMG]
    This set can haul the extra 5,000 lbs. because of the nine foot spread on the pup.
    [​IMG]

    This is a "B" train set of doubles with the 9 foot spread on each trailer. 154,000 lbs. gross.
    [​IMG]
     
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  7. Northern Flash

    Northern Flash Piss on our Flag, get a boycott against you.

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    They ARE much more stable than the wiggle wagons that are pulled by the LTL companies.
     
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  8. buffalobill

    buffalobill Well-Known Member

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    you are just in the wrong area, if you went over to Toledo, or anywhere actually, within so many miles of the Mi border, I think they have some law that allows the gravel trains, and the steel trains over. I see them sometimes around Gary/Chicago, and around western NY as well.

    It seems like different steel companies run different regions, Buffalo to Michigan or Gary is going to be trains or sleds, O&I, Ficel, Alco, Black Rock/Staub and Steel Transport Inc. Youngstown/Cleveland/Pittsburgh has mainly spread axle flats, like PI&I, Nick Strimbu, Yourga, B&T Express, PGT. The only company that I see pulling both Michigan style trailers and regular spread axle flatbeds is PGT and PI&I. lots of Owner Operators in steel hauling as well, seems like a decent way to stay regional as opposed to running a van or reefer, never more than a day out from home.

    Canadian steel haulers WS Deans, J syvet (spelling), and another greet truck co from Quebec all run those trains that you have seen that slide the 5th wheel under the trailer.
     
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  9. Northern Flash

    Northern Flash Piss on our Flag, get a boycott against you.

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    There is a limit as to how far the doubles can go cross the Michigan border. A few friends of mine drop one trailer in a drop yard near the border, and pull one at a time into the other states. Then hook them back together once emptied for the 6 hour ride home.
     
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  10. RacerX69

    RacerX69 Retired Gear Jammer/IBEW Retired/Wingnut

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    I see all the different combinations out my way. The B doubles run from British Columbia down into Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Montana. There are plenty of 53 foot trailers with 3 and 4 axles on them, the ones with 4 are usually drop axles with just a single at each end of the axle.

    There are also A trains out West, and the LTL carriers run doubles in Washington and California, and triples in Oregon, Wyoming, Utah, Montana and the Dakotas.

    Here is a Conway set I passed North of Casper in Wyoming a few years ago.

    [​IMG]Long Load by racerx6948, on Flickr

    I've even seen double 53 footers in South Dakota, just like they run up in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, and down in Oklahoma and out on the Ohio Turnpike.

    I took this photo up in Saskatoon the last time I went up there.

    [​IMG]53 Foot Doubles by racerx6948, on Flickr

    And I saw this rig on I-90 in South Dakota a couple years ago:

    [​IMG]
     
  11. WildHeart

    WildHeart Well-Known Member

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    UPS out of denver had a gal that pulled double 53" to Colorado Springs every night. They are around.
     

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