Frito Lay Truck pictures

Discussion in 'Frito-Lay' started by Matt, Dec 11, 2012.

  1. Matt

    Matt Supah truckah

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    That's when it's swamped. I'm glad it's few and far between. 350 about a night is good enough for me. I'm more than happy with that.
     
  2. CenturyClass

    CenturyClass Lead-side Recruit

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    dang, thats some good money
     
  3. Banker

    Banker Active Member

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    I did eventually hate that drop frame trailer but, in 1990 at 33cents per mile, $190 to unload it and the hotel of my choice, I very much enjoyed driving that rig! I can't lie, I was glad when they bought tandem hoods and E-Van trailers(trailers with no wheel wells). However those tractors with air ride rode pretty good.
     
  4. Big Dave

    Big Dave Dispatcher for Team BRG-Wong

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    What kind of back hauls did/do you guys do?
     
  5. Matt

    Matt Supah truckah

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    Typically nothing. But we do haul Budweiser. Sunflower seeds. Cardboard. And believe it or not potatoes.
    When we are "empty" we have empty carts, cardboard boxes , totes returns on from our stops anyway. So your never truly empty.
     
  6. Banker

    Banker Active Member

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    This is one of the best cabovers I ever drove. It had almost no dog house and rode as good as any hood at the time. I also miss being able to get my rig in the driveway to layover at the house. The picture is poor quality, but this was long before the Iphone.
    [​IMG]
     
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  7. SuperCourse

    SuperCourse Well-Known Member

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  8. Banker

    Banker Active Member

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    That is going way back in the day. The plant I was at had one of the trailers for storage, but the tractor was before my Frito days. This was also when the drivers unloaded the boxes without a 2-wheeler, or so the old timers said they did back in "The good ole days"!
     
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  9. JRut

    JRut Member

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    Wow I'm jealous. Wish I would have been around back in the cabover days. Wish we still had them! For some of the tight places we go into we could sure use them.
     
  10. JRut

    JRut Member

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  11. JRut

    JRut Member

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  12. JRut

    JRut Member

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  13. Banker

    Banker Active Member

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    I'm assuming your in Tx with the 57ft trailer. Frito sure has come a long way as far as equipment. Unloading a drop frame at mini bins verses unloading an E-van at a dock high warehouse sure made for a different days work!
     
  14. JRut

    JRut Member

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    Yes sir I don't know how yall did it back in the day. With my block bid now I barely ever do unloads anymore, unless I bid on extra OTR work on my off days. Which I do but we still have a lot of good paying drop and hook runs. We only have a few real bins left that aren't converted to PEC. PEC is way easier than bins.
     
  15. Banker

    Banker Active Member

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    I was at a small plant Louisville Ky, with roughly 30-35 drivers and we only had a few bid runs which were to Vend stops. We bid the road jobs daily and I usually unloaded 4-5 trailers a week. I could get a 1-2 stop load to Western Ky or Tn and then backhaul out of Pulaski Tn to Eastern Ky or Southern Il and be home late on the 2nd day. I tried to do 2 of these a week and then a short turn on Sat. I liked working Tues-Sat and if they had expanded our plant instead of closing it, I probably would have retired from Frito. We had some strictly driving loads which I did occasionally, but I usually preferred a 1-3 stop peddle load as this was where the money was at our plant.
     
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  16. JRut

    JRut Member

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  17. JRut

    JRut Member

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    Post some more truck pics drivers!
     
  18. JRut

    JRut Member

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  19. frito bandito

    frito bandito New Member

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    These pictures brought back fond(?) memories. I wasn't around with those old International conventionals, but I was around for the International cab-overs with the same paint job and those old silver trailers. I know when we got the Ford cab-overs they rode soooo much nicer that the 'binders and the Freightliners. Dick Larson and I ran the first scheduled sleeper-runs for Frito. We ran from the plant in Vancouver,WA to Billings MT (bin) and Miles City, MT (bin) for the first trip of the week, and to Ogden (bin) and Salt Lake City (small DC with no dock) for the second run of the week. We started in the snow in September 1978 running very small single axle Freightliner sleeper tractors. The week consisted of over 3600 miles, hand unloading over 5000 cases from a 35', 28' set of drop frame doubles. The tractors only had the single heater under the drivers seat, and no air conditioning into the sleeper. Since the company didn't run sleeper runs, the didn't spec the tractor with those things. When we got to Missoula Montana, we bought an electric blanket that went under you, so we had some warmth. Boy was it cold before we got that. When we got back off of our first run, the boss, Bill, asked us what we would change in the tractors. We told him, more heat (which they couldn't retofit in these tractors), air to the sleeper and a CB radio. Well, with the next tractors they ordered, more Freightliners, they got the first two, but not the CB.

    I hung around for 31 years six months and fifteen days. The changes in the equipment in those 31 years was absolutely amazing. From only single axle cabovers to some single, but mostly tandem axle conventionals. We did have a few single axle cabovers to keep the length of the triples down to 195 feet. Power from 260 and 290 HP to 460-480's mostly but the COEs had 505 to pull the 105,500 pounds we hauled occasionally. We did pull 100,000 pounds in a set of doubles (potatoes) as well. AM-FM radios, CBs, air ride, mondo-condo (as we called them) sleepers, cruise control, automatic chains, and on and on.

    I enjoyed my time there. I enjoyed driving. I enjoy my retirement. I enjoy life.
     
  20. JRut

    JRut Member

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    Great story. Just in my 2 1/2 years working for them I've seen drastic changes in equipment as well. From the older 10speed international diesel twin screws to new CNG automatic volvos. Still have a few diesels for the drivers with the longer runs but from my understanding they're not buying anymore diesel's.
     

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