Garden Thread

Discussion in 'The Drivers Lounge' started by ABFer, Nov 30, 2013.

  1. Road Dust

    Road Dust Sunshine

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    I always order the stringless beans. I can't stand them otherwise.
     
  2. pro1driver

    pro1driver I am LAST

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    i cannot give an exact answer for your question regarding how much to use for 1,000 square feet, as they go into pounds per 1,000 square footage.

    every time i try to look up the amount needed, it's always a different amount of pounds, never the same

    i'd hate to "under" lime, then of course, i'd hate to "over" lime..

    now this is all assuming of course, i need lime, and not magnesium....

    i will not know what is needed, until i actually buy the pH meter.

    i am trying to get some ideas from you gardeners, how much "might be" needed for such a small garden. this will also hold down my cost for either the lime or magnesium...
     
  3. WhiteBert

    WhiteBert New Member

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    I think that they can't survive but it depends i think.In my garden i have only flowers and lately i use to call a cleaning services to clean the garden and the house also at http://www.aton.fi/ cause winter is starting and i want it clean so that when spring come i have only several things to clean.
     
  4. ABFer

    ABFer Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I'd say about 1/4 of what it says to use for 1000 sq ft.
     
  5. Road Dust

    Road Dust Sunshine

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    I've never used lime but I know many folks do. Ever what amount you use, I don't think it will make a huge difference overnight. Once you get a general idea, just take it from there and test and adjust regularly.
     
  6. Road Dust

    Road Dust Sunshine

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    Well I can't say as I have ever cleaned my garden, but if I were to, I would hire Mr. Clean. He cleans anything.
     
  7. ABFer

    ABFer Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I have tested my garden but not recently. I have tossed my clam shells out there for quite a few years and there are so many that there are fragments all over. I figure that they will leech lime for a good long time. I think I'm going to move my garden to a different spot this year because my corn is not producing large ears anymore.
     
  8. Road Dust

    Road Dust Sunshine

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    Crop rotation is a good idea for everything. Even better if you can plant something to enrich the soil with nutrients that the previous crop depleted. Beans are good for adding nitrogen, but anything else, I would have to do some research.

    I'm totally redesigning my garden for this year. I'm going to make it in sections with pathways between them so I won't be walking on the growing areas and compacting the soil.
     
  9. ABFer

    ABFer Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I have a pretty big patch, rotate stuff around and every year some of it goes fallow but it's just not producing like it used to. My neighbor explained he had same problem way back when I started mine up here.
     
  10. Road Dust

    Road Dust Sunshine

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  11. ABFer

    ABFer Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I have heard of that but I have bad soil conditions. High clay content and wet during all but hot, dry summer months, then it dries out good and hard. Tilling it in the spring is a challenge and fall is pretty much out of the question for tilling it then planting something like that. I think they call them 'manure crops' as they provide nutrients to the soil.
     
  12. Road Dust

    Road Dust Sunshine

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    Sounds like your soil would benefit from "layering".
     
  13. ABFer

    ABFer Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I'll look into that.
     
  14. pro1driver

    pro1driver I am LAST

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    can't say for sure, but i thought that Rye grass is what the farmers plant for the nitrogen..???

    yep, i just looked it up....

    9 Things To Know About Annual Ryegrass - No-Till Farmer
     
  15. Road Dust

    Road Dust Sunshine

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  16. pro1driver

    pro1driver I am LAST

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    uh...sorry...missy....

    but unless you are AS OLD AS ME....

    you got no right to be forgetful.>!!!!!....​j/k....!!!!
     
  17. pro1driver

    pro1driver I am LAST

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    damn...that was fast
     
  18. Road Dust

    Road Dust Sunshine

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    It was so fast I missed it. What was it?
     
  19. pro1driver

    pro1driver I am LAST

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    the blazing speed of your response...

    you must have a rocket of a 'puter...
     
  20. Road Dust

    Road Dust Sunshine

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    Not sure if I was using my Toshiba lap top or my Galaxy S4. I done forgot already, LOL!!!
     

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