OK Hows come the steering wheel holder always get blamed 4 rollovers?

Discussion in 'Trucking Accidents' started by Apostolic, Sep 5, 2009.

  1. imported_OleGuy

    imported_OleGuy Member

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    I drove weekend's 1951 (sophomore in high school) to 5/1953 graduation.
    Then went meat packer till 6/54, flatbed to 8/55, bulls (produce in season)56-57. Teamed MS to LA/FRISCO some Seattle till March 59, and JOINED US ARMY...

    Came out with wife and daughter and got off road. Got in equipment business as employee and owner till 94. Used my tandem roll back in it and rented semi's for hauling auction purchases. Sold it and semi retired. Kept my hand in with friends. Some are nice. Will let me make the trip if I pay my own expenses and a few will LET ME DRIVE.....

    The pieces I saw were thin tore up things. Probably the forerunners of later designs. Teflon was not real tuff when it first came out. In 1990 Pallet Mule
    Pallet jack began using it as the load bearing under the jack to cross piece.
    So later it was more prevalent. Tuff stuff for rip rap to slide down and it stay in the truck.
    End of Historical review
     
  2. Apostolic

    Apostolic Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Gee thanks a lot for sharing your Trucking BIO OleGuy.
    I always enjoy seeing how my fellow trucker got in the trade,and how everything is going for them.
    Thanks again for sharing.
    So you must have had to deal with the swinging beef,hog,goats,and sheep back in the day if you were a meat slinger.

    That was a very hard way to earn a living.
    Todays kids would in no way know the hard work trucking,and dock work used to be back in the day.

    Such as oh my,no power steering,or air conditioning.
     
  3. Cerberus_Kelpie

    Cerberus_Kelpie Wings Over the World!

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    ...or Air Ride Suspension, Air Ride Seats....
     
  4. imported_OleGuy

    imported_OleGuy Member

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    But we did have the 2 lane roads (and before they added the 2' strips to each side), before 3 lane hills and 4 lanes and then Interstates.
    We had truck routes... Hiway come in, truck route ran you offsides thru sparse residential area (Tuscaloosa,AL) and back on US11 at the foot of the hill ending at Druid City Hospital. Pull it quietly in low side of 2nd.
    Could go thru Dallas to Ft Worth on US80 city route except for the small deviation of Loop 12.
    Old US 11 was three lane across most of VA. You used the two right pulling up hill, top was no man land, down on your one lane, while up bound pulled the other two. Now level stretches were fun (level in VA??).Center was the passing lane. Peek out, gouge on it, get ahead and receive the courtesy space.

    Oh, A_Post...
    Loading whop sided didn't exist. Reason, no/few fork trucks. Hand loaded and unloaded by ? men and ? hand trucks. Those guys could watch you back in. see your kind of rig, and load you out 3-4 bags/boxes high front to 1/3 way back, then go to 4/5 high on back. Your told them how may boxes fruit (90 lbs) or bags (100 lbs) you were getting. Usually you loaded out balanced. (I did not say legal. 360 bags are heavy.)
     
  5. Apostolic

    Apostolic Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Oh yes this does bring back memories of the bad old days of trucking.
    Before the pallet,and shrink wrap was invented.
    I remember dropping trailers at the Kodak docks to handle boxes of film.
    Floor to the roof,loading most of the day.

    The old battle cry when handling freight,was high,and tight.

    Oh my yes the bad old days,kids now a days could never relate.
    Like the heavy floor tiles loaded knee high all on the floor when you had to hoist up each case and put it on a roller then push it off the trailer to the receiver on the ground.

    When you punched out,and went to bed at night,you never had a bit of trouble falling asleep.
     

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