The ‘future of trucking’ in 1964

Discussion in 'The Drivers Lounge' started by PearlyJoe, Oct 9, 2017.

  1. PearlyJoe

    PearlyJoe Active Member

    Messages:
    105
    Likes Received:
    89
    Trophy Points:
    28
  2. seabreeze

    seabreeze Not Well Known Member, 60 Year Teamster Member

    Messages:
    1,359
    Likes Received:
    1,597
    Trophy Points:
    113
    pro1driver likes this.
  3. DCM_Doc

    DCM_Doc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,750
    Likes Received:
    2,379
    Trophy Points:
    113
    From what I heard fuel mileage was about half of diesel powered units at the time.
     
  4. seabreeze

    seabreeze Not Well Known Member, 60 Year Teamster Member

    Messages:
    1,359
    Likes Received:
    1,597
    Trophy Points:
    113
    NO, it was even less, about 2 mpg they claimed.
    This thing caught fire at H&M's shop, it had an auto fire suppression system, but still burned the wires off.
    A friend of mine ran the shop at H&M, Ford hauled iit away on a special lowboy, never to return again.
    He said it was 13' tall
     
  5. pro1driver

    pro1driver I am LAST

    Messages:
    5,857
    Likes Received:
    1,022
    Trophy Points:
    113
    well i watch both videos, neither one addressed sleeping areas, unless the tilting passenger seat WAS the bed for the driver?

    anyways, at least "some aerodynamics were being used, like the skirts and shape of the cab, but 96 feet long?

    that would be a nice (but expensive) restoration project for some tv show.
     
  6. seabreeze

    seabreeze Not Well Known Member, 60 Year Teamster Member

    Messages:
    1,359
    Likes Received:
    1,597
    Trophy Points:
    113
    You're right about the shotgun seat, it was designed for sleep.
    No trailers were with this unit, just tractor.
     
  7. pro1driver

    pro1driver I am LAST

    Messages:
    5,857
    Likes Received:
    1,022
    Trophy Points:
    113
    the video said that with trailers, it would be 96 feet long, and i did see a trailer.

    and that passenger seat didn't look too comfortable to me, reminds me of my current recliner, yes, i can fall asleep in it, but wake up all achy as it's not really a very good position for a long sleep.
     
  8. seabreeze

    seabreeze Not Well Known Member, 60 Year Teamster Member

    Messages:
    1,359
    Likes Received:
    1,597
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I was referring to the unit in Charl, it had no trailer.
    They are not concerned about old age pains, don't need to take long sleeps, they need you hauling freight, get with the
    program and help pay for this monstrosity!
     
    pro1driver likes this.
  9. Cerberus_Kelpie

    Cerberus_Kelpie Wings Over the World!

    Messages:
    2,668
    Likes Received:
    436
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Looks like a rejuvenated project from the 30's when Buckminster "Bucky" Fuller was creating vehicle and other designs.

    2 mpg wasn't a good option regardless of how "quietly" the engine performed.
    No Sleeper would still = "No Deal--No Sale".

    Ford had some "better ideas" as we've seen yet some, like the truck, were bad ideas (possibly) rejuvenated.
    - - - -
    Siting as high as that appeared would have been a wee bit startling going under overpasses as well trees. 13' clearance where many "drivers" of today would commit suicide by hitting 12' 5" and up overpasses.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2017
  10. Cerberus_Kelpie

    Cerberus_Kelpie Wings Over the World!

    Messages:
    2,668
    Likes Received:
    436
    Trophy Points:
    83
    For your enjoyment or revulsion, Strange, Odd, Peculiar Trucks of The World:


    I like the Japanese models however I do not believe the D.O.T. would approve as there appear to be some minor DISTRACTIONS.

    General Motors Parade Of Progress beat the "novel idea" of Ford by 30 years.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2017
  11. DCM_Doc

    DCM_Doc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,750
    Likes Received:
    2,379
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Innovative & new ideas are necessary for progress in the trucking industry but they must function in real world conditions.
     

Share This Page