The Pitfalls of Single-Payer Health Care: Canada’s Cautionary Tale

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Toby, Jun 30, 2017.

  1. Toby

    Toby Well-Known Member

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    "Before resigning themselves to socialized medicine, flummoxed legislators should consider the experience of our neighbors to the North."

    https://www.google.com/amp/amp.nati...r-health-care-system-failures-cautionary-tale

    "There’s just one problem: The Canadian model of universal coverage is failing.

    ASSESSING CANADA’S SINGLE-PAYER SYSTEM

    The Canada Health Act (CHA), introduced in 1984, governs the complicated fiscal agreement between the provinces, who administer health services, and the feds, who manage their health-insurance monopoly and transfer funds to the local governments. Unlike in the United Kingdom, where health care is socialized and hospitals are run by the National Health Service, in Canada health care is technically delivered privately, although given the Kafkaesque regulations and restrictions that govern it, the system is by no means market-based. In fact, Canada’s government-controlled health-care system has become more restrictive than communist China’s.

    Debates about health-care policy typically revolve around three key metrics: universality, affordability, and quality.

    Canada passes the first test with flying colors: Every resident of the country is insured under the CHA, with covered procedures free at the point of delivery. While medical providers are independent from the federal government, they are compelled to accept CHA insurance —and nothing else — by a prohibition on accepting payments outside the national-insurance scheme so long as they wish to continue accepting federal health-transfer funds. The spigot of money from Ottawa thus ensures a de facto government monopoly in the health-insurance market.

    The CHA provides and ensures universal coverage from the top down. In Canada, the government determines what procedures are medically necessary. Bureaucrats, not doctors, decide which procedures and treatments are covered under the CHA — based on data and statistics rather than on the needs of patients. While private insurance does exist — an OECD report found that 75 percent of Canadians have supplementary insurance — it applies only to procedures and services that fall outside the CHA — including dental work, optometric care, and pharmaceutical drugs."
     

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