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It has to be so, cause RB says so

Razorblade

Well-Known Member
Care to explain how ABF is doomed? I can’t wait to hear this one from the great Hypocrites.
ABF is subject to the same high cost labor as the other union carriers. ABF may be the "last man standing" but will eventually be unable to compete.
I will write it again and you will deny it again. When the costs exceed revenue, companies cease to exist. ABF has no product to sell. They manufacture nothing and own nothing on the trucks. They control none of the fixed costs of doing business and must compete on pricing and service. Labor has become a fixed price. Work rules and contractual division of labor do not allow for flexibility or efficiency. Company provided healthcare with no premiums and no deductibles is unsustainable as costs rise at more than twice the inflation rate.
 

GIALLO

Active Member
It's impossible to sail a sinking ship. The very best you can do is keep it afloat as long as possible. That is Yellow.
The reality is that management has done an amazing job just to keep operating while 600+ other union carriers have failed. The fall of Yellow and Roadway was obvious 20 years ago. They followed the same plan as Associated Transport and Eastern Freightways by merging two companies in decline. Other companies were brought in to maintain revenue and cash flow. The difference is that the union allowed Yellow-Roadway to survive. The IBT has given the company enough latitude to continue to operate and maintain jobs for as long as possible.
The non union carriers are not handcuffed by archaic work rules and unsustainable benefit costs. Their workforce flexibility is efficient and productive. Non union freight is not the future, it is the present. The Teamster model is unsustainable and even the great and profitable ABF is doomed.
I am hated on this board for repeatedly posting this but all of you know that I am correct.
Sorry brother, maybe some true but in reality there is billions to be made every year, but somehow the banksters, directors and union representatives are the ones getting the most pieces of the pie.:poke:
 

Razorblade

Well-Known Member
Sorry brother, maybe some true but in reality there is billions to be made every year, but somehow the banksters, directors and union representatives are the ones getting the most pieces of the pie.:poke:
Not true. It's the fools who rely on paychecks that get left behind. Those who save and invest, those who become shareholders and owners of the banks and businesses will always be successful. Those who spend every dollar and save nothing choose to fail.
 

Steward of the Rock

Well-Known Member
ABF is subject to the same high cost labor as the other union carriers. ABF may be the "last man standing" but will eventually be unable to compete.
I will write it again and you will deny it again. When the costs exceed revenue, companies cease to exist. ABF has no product to sell. They manufacture nothing and own nothing on the trucks. They control none of the fixed costs of doing business and must compete on pricing and service. Labor has become a fixed price. Work rules and contractual division of labor do not allow for flexibility or efficiency. Company provided healthcare with no premiums and no deductibles is unsustainable as costs rise at more than twice the inflation rate.
So great Hypocrites, when are the end times for ABF so we will all be prepared when it happens?
 

Razorblade

Well-Known Member
So great Hypocrites, when are the end times for ABF so we will all be prepared when it happens?
There will be clues. Longer tractor service intervals, smaller tire banks at large terminals and none at the smaller ones. Fewer mechanics. Keeping power units longer and putting more miles on them. Combining terminals to create more direct load opportunities and reduce breakbulk costs. Meet turns leading to all turns to reduce and eliminate motels and layover expense.
Same with the dock operation. Older forklifts with less maintenance. Ragged yard horses. No building maintenance. Lights out that don't get fixed. No cardboard dunnage. Potholes in the yards and an end to snow removal.
Before there was Yellow-Roadway Corp., Big R sold nearly all their pups to a leasing company and then rented them back. They created an infusion of cash out of thin air.
We have differing opinions, but you are a smart guy. Pay attention and you will see it slowly creeping up on you.
 

Skyking68

Active Member
ABF is subject to the same high cost labor as the other union carriers. ABF may be the "last man standing" but will eventually be unable to compete.
I will write it again and you will deny it again. When the costs exceed revenue, companies cease to exist. ABF has no product to sell. They manufacture nothing and own nothing on the trucks. They control none of the fixed costs of doing business and must compete on pricing and service. Labor has become a fixed price. Work rules and contractual division of labor do not allow for flexibility or efficiency. Company provided healthcare with no premiums and no deductibles is unsustainable as costs rise at more than twice the inflation rate.
They just make millions every year,....let's face it, they really do set the standards in our industry, hate it all you want, numbers don't lie
 

Steward of the Rock

Well-Known Member
There will be clues. Longer tractor service intervals, smaller tire banks at large terminals and none at the smaller ones. Fewer mechanics. Keeping power units longer and putting more miles on them. Combining terminals to create more direct load opportunities and reduce breakbulk costs. Meet turns leading to all turns to reduce and eliminate motels and layover expense.
Same with the dock operation. Older forklifts with less maintenance. Ragged yard horses. No building maintenance. Lights out that don't get fixed. No cardboard dunnage. Potholes in the yards and an end to snow removal.
Ok Hypocrites (pronounced hip/pock/ruh/tees). ABF is still financial strong because they are very innovative. U-Pak, ReloCube, Mobile Platform, etc., are all ABF originals. U-pak and ReloCube are extremely profitable for ABF (ArcBest). And if they finally get the Mobile Platform program operating like they want, it is going to decrease the transit time for long haul freight dramatically. That is why ABF is financial stable because they are not afraid to try something new. And it usually works. And we have very few “change of operations” here at ABF. The way things are going right now, it looks like we are about to have one of our most profitable years ever. So, it is hard to see all the gloom and doom you are saying will soon happen to ABF. I see the glass as half full, while you see the glass being empty and broken. But I will keep an eye out for the warning signs you mentioned about the freight apocalypse that you say is going to happen to ABF in the near future.
 

seabreeze

Not Well Known Member, 63 Year Teamster Member
Premium
Ok Hypocrites (pronounced hip/pock/ruh/tees). ABF is still financial strong because they are very innovative. U-Pak, ReloCube, Mobile Platform, etc., are all ABF originals. U-pak and ReloCube are extremely profitable for ABF (ArcBest). And if they finally get the Mobile Platform program operating like they want, it is going to decrease the transit time for long haul freight dramatically. That is why ABF is financial stable because they are not afraid to try something new. And it usually works. And we have very few “change of operations” here at ABF. The way things are going right now, it looks like we are about to have one of our most profitable years ever. So, it is hard to see all the gloom and doom you are saying will soon happen to ABF. I see the glass as half full, while you see the glass being empty and broken. But I will keep an eye out for the warning signs you mentioned about the freight apocalypse that you say is going to happen to ABF in the near future.
Smart move SOR, you still have your cousin to lean on during hard times.
Don't let this doom's day gloom get you down.
Plus we don't pay these outrageous taxes like some I know.
 

GO40

Well-Known Member
The non union carriers are not handcuffed by archaic work rules and unsustainable benefit costs. Their workforce flexibility is efficient and productive.
Just goes to show you how out dated your statement is. The last few contracts ABF gave up a bunch of work rules that benefit the company. For one the road operation add UE drivers which are hourly cheaper & work the dock at both locations. They added cameras that gives you live video where disciplinary action can & will be used against us. We have handheld computer’s that also trace your every move. Now tell me how ABF is handcuffed?
 

Razorblade

Well-Known Member
Just goes to show you how out dated your statement is. The last few contracts ABF gave up a bunch of work rules that benefit the company. For one the road operation add UE drivers which are hourly cheaper & work the dock at both locations. They added cameras that gives you live video where disciplinary action can & will be used against us. We have handheld computer’s that also trace your every move. Now tell me how ABF is handcuffed?
Have you seen the ABF forum? Have you seen the "something to go after in the next contract" thread. A hole forum dedicated to it's never enough. We must kill the golden goose.
Why are employees doing their job worried about handhelds and cameras?
UE drivers working and being paid for every minute is a problem? Overtime hourly pay is a bad thing?
You do realize that when paid by the mile, every mile you drive costs the company less money. Fixed benefit costs don't change. After weekly mileage pay equals the 40 hour pay, the driver costs are cut in half. Something less than 1500 miles pays all your benefits and you get no overtime for the remaining miles. ABF loves the wheel board. The more you work, the less it costs per mile.
 

GO40

Well-Known Member
Have you seen the ABF forum? Have you seen the "something to go after in the next contract" thread. A hole forum dedicated to it's never enough. We must kill the golden goose.
Why are employees doing their job worried about handhelds and cameras?
UE drivers working and being paid for every minute is a problem? Overtime hourly pay is a bad thing?
You do realize that when paid by the mile, every mile you drive costs the company less money. Fixed benefit costs don't change. After weekly mileage pay equals the 40 hour pay, the driver costs are cut in half. Something less than 1500 miles pays all your benefits and you get no overtime for the remaining miles. ABF loves the wheel board. The more you work, the less it costs per mile.
So we should go after nothing the next contract? All the points I brought up were to be flexible. Our UE drivers don’t make anything close to a road driver, guess that’s what happens when you’re out of the industry for a while & have no clue what you are posting….Why don’t you apply at ABF so you can come save us….
 

Steward of the Rock

Well-Known Member
Have you seen the ABF forum? Have you seen the "something to go after in the next contract" thread. A hole forum dedicated to it's never enough. We must kill the golden goose.
Because ABF is so profitable, we can ask for more. Most of it we will not get, but some of it we will. Not to mention that ABF offers sign on bonuses of up to $10,000 in some areas of their own doing. No contract language to force them to do this. In my area, ABF currently pays double time for those that work their 6th or 7th day in the city, dock, hostle supplement. Contract states that 7th day only pays double time. Yet our company agrees to pay us either day or both if you choose to work it at double the hourly rate. And yet, for the first 6 months of 2021, our operating ratio was a 92.5%. And, if a FreightWaves article I read was accurate, For the first 9 months of 2021, ArcBest’s LTL division (ABF) has operated at an 89.6% OR which is a 600-bp (basis points) improvement over the last five years. So, ask me again why the union employees of ABF ask for better pay and benefits come contract time.
 
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Razorblade

Well-Known Member
Because ABF is so profitable, we can ask for more. Most of it we will not get, but some of it we will. Not to mention that ABF offers sign on bonuses of up to $10,000 in some areas of their own doing. No contract language to force them to do this. In my area, ABF currently pays double time for those that work their 6th or 7th day in the city, dock, hostle supplement. Contract states that 7th day only pays double time. Yet our company agrees to pay us either day or both if you choose to work it at double the hourly rate. And yet, for the first 6 months of 2021, our operating ratio was a 92.5%. And, if a FreightWaves article I read was accurate, For the first 9 months of 2021, ArcBest’s LTL division (ABF) has operated at an 89.6% OR which is a 600-bp (basis points) improvement over the last five years. So, ask me again why the union employees of ABF ask for better pay and benefits come contract time.
92.5 OR is amazing. Before taxes and replacing equipment of course. But even so 92.5 is great. That means a 1.5 million in revenue will almost pay the wages and benefits of one 40 hour dock worker.
I bet if I told you that saving 7.5% of you pay is a crazy amount of money and you should pay the people who mow your lawn more and save less, that would be something you could agree with.
 

Steward of the Rock

Well-Known Member
92.5 OR is amazing. Before taxes and replacing equipment of course. But even so 92.5 is great. That means a 1.5 million in revenue will almost pay the wages and benefits of one 40 hour dock worker.
I bet if I told you that saving 7.5% of you pay is a crazy amount of money and you should pay the people who mow your lawn more and save less, that would be something you could agree with.
If I had someone mow my lawn, I would use the one that did the best job. Even if it meant paying a little more for it. So, yes I would pay more for quality. And it is good to know that I alone am responsible for 1.5 million dollars of ABF’s revenue. And yet ABF has averaged over a 100 million dollar profit per year over the last three years, and on goal to blow that average out of the water this year. I knew I was being under paid for my labor and now I have the proof of it. LOL!!!
 
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seabreeze

Not Well Known Member, 63 Year Teamster Member
Premium
92.5 OR is amazing. Before taxes and replacing equipment of course. But even so 92.5 is great. That means a 1.5 million in revenue will almost pay the wages and benefits of one 40 hour dock worker.
I bet if I told you that saving 7.5% of you pay is a crazy amount of money and you should pay the people who mow your lawn more and save less, that would be something you could agree with.
WOW, pay 10K plus in taxes and HAVE someone mow your lawn?
And I thought I had a lavish lifestyle!
 

Razorblade

Well-Known Member
WOW, pay 10K plus in taxes and HAVE someone mow your lawn?
And I thought I had a lavish lifestyle!
Condo living, nothing like it. No lawncare, no weeds, trees and shrubs trimmed and leaves removed in the fall. No snow plowing. A two inch snowfall automatically triggers the snow removal company. New driveway last year. 3300 square feet, finished walkout basement with patio. 2 1/2 car heated garage. Above the patio is a deck overlooking a small, one acre lake, with a fountain of course. Nothing beyond my inside walls is my responsibility.
Heather, from Molly Maids, shows up every Thursday to clean and do laundry.
Stephanie, the mobile groomer, comes every month to bath and trim the two dogs.
Life is good.
 

Razorblade

Well-Known Member
Because ABF is so profitable, we can ask for more.
I have made a vow to be kinder, gentler and less confrontational. However, I don't understand that attitude.
I get that the labor movement's beginnings were, in part, to give the front line worker a return on his investment of time and talent. Time and talent being as important as capital investing but with less risk. The question is how much is the job worth? That, in my view, is a question answered by the labor marketplace. ABF is paying double time because that is what it takes to get the job done. They don't pay double because they want to. They don't pay double because they have been extorted to do so. They pay double because that is what the free market requires to get the job done. They pay hiring bonuses because the labor market requires them to do so in order to hire qualified people.
I also don't get it when management, including the management of labor resources, gets no credit for the success of ABF. How is it that the disaster called YRC is all the fault of management with no responsibility accepted by the union workforce but a very successful ABF gets no respect from union labor for being exceptionally well run?
 
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