Jackhammer.

Brutal man , I'm saying granite is a mos 7 Granite is one of the hardest substances in the world. One of the only materials that is harder than granite is a diamond. The hardness of granite makes it durable. Unlike other stone types, granite won't crumble or break over time. That's why they make tombstones out of it . A13 don't kill yourself man .
 
I was using a breaker point to try to break the tops off of rocks coming up through my driveway. Some of the rock was so hard, I had to drill down in a few spots and then try to go at an angle to fracture it. That stuff is tough.
 
I have always envied men who helped with great projects such as this or helped design/build bridges, roads or large buildings. They can see what they had a part in building usually for their entire lifetime Most large construction projects last many years once completed. Many of the trucks I worked on when I started in this business have already served their purpose they were designed for & been recycled. Most of the tractors in the fleet when I retired have been sold & replaced with newer units.
I do miss keeping up with changes in technology. Just about every new model had changes from the previous year model. I would probably be lost on the newer equipment. Old brains don't adapt to new technology easily.
As you know, I've been around for a long time.
I've driven a lot of different trucks, worked on Woodward, Bosch governors, Cummins Double Disc, and P T pumps, and rebuilt Detroit blowers, but today, I'm lost as Slave trying to get top dollar for his catalytic converter.
I'd need to learn how to drive the new equipment.
 
I was using a breaker point to try to break the tops off of rocks coming up through my driveway. Some of the rock was so hard, I had to drill down in a few spots and then try to go at an angle to fracture it. That stuff is tough.
What's a rock?
We only have sand and a few seashells.
I was drilling an irrigation well and hit seashells at 21' deep.
 
As you know, I've been around for a long time.
I've driven a lot of different trucks, worked on Woodward, Bosch governors, Cummins Double Disc, and P T pumps, and rebuilt Detroit blowers, but today, I'm lost as Slave trying to get top dollar for his catalytic converter.
I'd need to learn how to drive the new equipment.
I have been retired a relatively short time, not nearly as long as you, but every year brings changes. Software is often updated several times during the life of the tractor. You would have a tough time getting used to auto shift transmissions & not being able to find the clutch pedal. When I started in this business, the engines had no electronics, except for some with one wire to the shut off solenoid & that could be put on manual so the engine would not shut off. Tractors could run during daylight hours without a generator/alternator.
 
I knew a gentleman who lived to be 103. He worked on the construction of the Hoover Dam. He said jackhammer operators punched holes for dynamite on bluffs were suspended by ropes over the bluff. But that was back when men were men.
We visited Mt Rushmore in 2015. This is the machine they used to cut most of the mountain after dynamiting it.

Buda would normally wait until Korczak was at the top, and then sputter to a stop. Korczak would have to climb down, start it back up, then climb again. They told us Budah normally kaputed 9 times a day, until enough funds were raised to buy a better one...

Korczak Ziolkowski - Wikipedia


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They are still carving out the Crazy Horse Memorial. Started circ 1942-45, if I remember right?
Same stone cutter started working it as Mt Rushmore, about 10 miles away…


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This is the model. They are carving the mountain.
 
Here’s the tour. Where I used to deliver. not my video tho. About a 3 mile trip in to out, all underground.

I ran it with 53’/102”, and with pups. Had to break up the pups at a dead end and rehook them to turn around. (Our warehouse was at a dead end). This was near Kansas City, not Scranton!
 
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Here’s the tour. Where I used to deliver. not my video tho. About a 3 mile trip in to out, all underground.

I ran it with 53’/102”, and with pups. Had to break up the pups at a dead end and rehook them to turn around. (Our warehouse was at a dead end). This was near Kansas City, not Scranton!
My brother lives near there. Very interesting place.
 
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