FedEx Freight | Nashville,TN.,Fedex Freight Set hit a car with a flat tire,rolling the kite.

Again we have hit something that was not moving. We didn't change lanes to avoid a hazard. When are we going to recognize that a business model that involves working drivers that hard (my assumption is that this was a run involving dock time) and holding that driver until he has just enough time to get home just might not be the best?
 
I'm glad nobody was seriously injured, but I think it's kind of funny that, every time they see the name FEDEX, they always say: "packages were thrown everywhere"; instead of cargo or freight. Just a thought.
 
[quote author=hairbear link=topic=79623.msg825225#msg825225 date=1272416589]
Again we have hit something that was not moving. We didn't change lanes to avoid a hazard. When are we going to recognize that a business model that involves working drivers that hard (my assumption is that this was a run involving dock time) and holding that driver until he has just enough time to get home just might not be the best?
[/quote]

Looking at equipment history for this trailer (so easy a caveman can do it) tells us that the driver was dispatched from Memphis to Nashville around 20:00, which would indeed be a shuttle run involving dock work. But you're insinuating that he was on the back side of his run, too tired to be driving after working the dock all night.

The reality is that he was on the front side of the run, as the story says the accident happened around 23:30. So conceivably, he could have been on a laydown from Memphis to Timbuktu at this time of night.

But MAYBE the woman in the car didn't have her flashers on; MAYBE she was over the line and in a spot where he couldn't see her until he too close to move over; MAYBE he was distracted by any number of other factors, i.e. simple (and potentially tragic!) driver error.

So what does the business model have to do with a Monday night 23:30 accident? Or is this just more sour grapes because your world got rocked and changed (remember, we went through this around 15 years ago. We got over it pretty quick though).

oaf (change agent)
 
Judging from the number of serious accidents on your side over the last 15 years, even adjusted for the disparity in size, are you sure your side "got over it"?
BTW what flavor was the koolaid this morning?
 
[quote author=hairbear link=topic=79623.msg825225#msg825225 date=1272416589]
Again we have hit something that was not moving. We didn't change lanes to avoid a hazard. When are we going to recognize that a business model that involves working drivers that hard (my assumption is that this was a run involving dock time) and holding that driver until he has just enough time to get home just might not be the best?
[/quote]


What's the alternative? Hire full time dock help to move the freight? It's never going to happen. Ltl companies have run shuttles for decades. We're no exception. Working the dock doesn't make you plow into parked cars, bad driving skills do.
 
[quote author=Old AF link=topic=79623.msg825308#msg825308 date=1272459554]
[quote author=hairbear link=topic=79623.msg825225#msg825225 date=1272416589]
Again we have hit something that was not moving. We didn't change lanes to avoid a hazard. When are we going to recognize that a business model that involves working drivers that hard (my assumption is that this was a run involving dock time) and holding that driver until he has just enough time to get home just might not be the best?
[/quote]

Looking at equipment history for this trailer (so easy a caveman can do it) tells us that the driver was dispatched from Memphis to Nashville around 20:00, which would indeed be a shuttle run involving dock work. But you're insinuating that he was on the back side of his run, too tired to be driving after working the dock all night.

The reality is that he was on the front side of the run, as the story says the accident happened around 23:30. So conceivably, he could have been on a laydown from Memphis to Timbuktu at this time of night.

But MAYBE the woman in the car didn't have her flashers on; MAYBE she was over the line and in a spot where he couldn't see her until he too close to move over; MAYBE he was distracted by any number of other factors, i.e. simple (and potentially tragic!) driver error.

So what does the business model have to do with a Monday night 23:30 accident? Or is this just more sour grapes because your world got rocked and changed (remember, we went through this around 15 years ago. We got over it pretty quick though).

oaf (change agent)
[/quote]

You're wasting your breath dude. Some drivers out west can't fathom the thought of putting a couple of hours on the dock. It's almost like the work is beneath them. I've run a shuttle and driven 380 miles a day for thirteen years. I never once felt that climbing onto a forklift was anything more or less than climbing into a truck.

Kool-aid drinkers we're called.
 
[quote author=Old AF link=topic=79623.msg825541#msg825541 date=1272545233]
LOL @Slackdragon. I like my koolaid chilled with extra hops!

oaf (poppin' a top, again)
[/quote] :kicking: :kicking:
 
if driver was going to nashville on shuttle run,he has option to work or not work on dock.run 468 miles.i ran memphis turn out of nashville. memphis would hold you until cut time,if a kickout was offered turn a window.average 12 hour day,
 
[quote author=hairbear link=topic=79623.msg825225#msg825225 date=1272416589]
Again we have hit something that was not moving. We didn't change lanes to avoid a hazard. When are we going to recognize that a business model that involves working drivers that hard (my assumption is that this was a run involving dock time) and holding that driver until he has just enough time to get home just might not be the best?
[/quote]

Why does it have to be the company working the driver too hard? Could it be the driver just have his head up his rear end and didn't move over? I see it every day. I sat on the side of the road for 5 hours one day with a blown transmission and I'd say only 50% of truck drivers moved over. Some didn't even though there wasn't anyone in the other lane.
 
You're absolutely right Guardrail, so many people on our highways don't even have a clue. I would guess about 50% of truck drivers alone, don't move if they can or not, yet when they're on the side of the road, will be the first to biotch about it. In Il, there is a law called scott's law, if you don't move over or slow down, it's a ticket, however, they don't enforce it. the one's I really like is when you get over for a vehicle on the side of the road, and cars and trucks try to pass you on the right, and then you turn on your turn signal, come back over and put them on the shoulder. People just don't care anymore, they're in to big a hurry.
 
[quote author=rodedawg link=topic=79623.msg826385#msg826385 date=1272802298]
You're absolutely right Guardrail, so many people on our highways don't even have a clue. I would guess about 50% of truck drivers alone, don't move if they can or not, yet when they're on the side of the road, will be the first to biotch about it. In Il, there is a law called scott's law, if you don't move over or slow down, it's a ticket, however, they don't enforce it. the one's I really like is when you get over for a vehicle on the side of the road, and cars and trucks try to pass you on the right, and then you turn on your turn signal, come back over and put them on the shoulder. People just don't care anymore, they're in to big a hurry.
[/quote] :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:
 
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