Yellow | Question for YRC P&D drivers.

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I was talking recently to a YRC P&D driver and he was telling me that there are serious problems with his peddle runs on a regular basis. Those problems would include freight not even being on the trailer, seriously damaged freight loaded onto the trailer and no way to even identify who was responsible for these things. He attributed it to part time dock workers. I know this guy pretty well and I don't think he was pulling my leg. Are the problems over there this bad, or is this an isolated case? These are things that all the concessions in the world won't make up for.
 
I'm a p&d at 150 and we have problems too. We have a TM that is pretty much useless. The one that runs the barn is the Dispatcher. He is good. But dock guys need to be more accountable in the way they load the trucks. Some days are better than others.
 
Depends what day of the week we're talking about, monday & tuesday they try to slam you with freight then its light the next day or too. I will say that any real P&D should be checking his load and seeing if any exemptions were written up on the DR's. Biggest issue now would be shipments short or split up at the EOL.

Part timers don't show up half the time cause the fact they could make more $$$ flippin burgers after they take dues and 15% burning gas money up for 4-5 hrs of work, plus it is getting cold.
 
ABFer if this guy is running the same peddle and knows that area then they should be loading it to the way he runs it. Yeah I know he'll might have to run it the way they loaded it but if they load it they way he wants it run. It'll make a difference whether you get the freight off or got returns not making service. Damaged freight on the I/B shift should be known b/4 its loaded nothing new here someone just not doing their job.
 
This argument is as old as the trade itself. Drivers are prima donnas and dock don't know the routes. Management wether it be dock supervisor or TM really dont care. This is one of those conversations you can have with any P&D or dock worker. Its what makes us all unite at any stop no matter who you work for.
 
ABFer if this guy is running the same peddle and knows that area then they should be loading it to the way he runs it. Yeah I know he'll might have to run it the way they loaded it but if they load it they way he wants it run. It'll make a difference whether you get the freight off or got returns not making service. Damaged freight on the I/B shift should be known b/4 its loaded nothing new here someone just not doing their job.
I know that but it doesn't seem to be happening for this guy. If it's that way all over there is nothing that can save them.
 
Dock never has todeal with customer (don't recoup etc) just thats the way it came in. They have no idea. Take PRIDE mgmt doesn't need to babysit
 
Dock never has todeal with customer (don't recoup etc) just thats the way it came in. They have no idea. Take PRIDE mgmt doesn't need to babysit

I have been P&D for 30 years. I carry a roll of shrinkwrap and a roll of tape in tractor everyday. Sometimes it is not easy to recoup some of the packaging, but sometimes it can be presentable to the customer. You are right in the fact that the dock doesn't have to deal with the customers and freight should be put on trailer the way the loader would want to unload it, but that seldom happens. I told one of our experienced dock workers the other day about trailers having a high side and low side because he was stacking freight real high on the high side and small pallets of freight on the low side. I told him that all of the tall freight would be on top of the small pallets after I drove hour and half to delivery area and he said no one have ever told him that.

One of the biggest problems in the loading of peddle runs is that the loader doesn't know where customers are located and the loader hasn't ever been trained in proper way to load freight. One of our outbound loaders was trying to put some semi-heavy freight on top of some gaylords the other night. Thank goodness one of the experienced loaders told him to use logistic bars because the freight in the gaylords was very expensive (about $10,000.00 per gaylord). Loader had no idea, but probably didn't care either.

Just for ABFer info, I was talking to one of ABF delivery guys the other day. His story was about the same as yours. Loaders not loading his trailer the right way and he had just left a customer whose freight was torn apart and just laying on floor of trailer. I guess it is the same story, no matter which company you work for.
 
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