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The Unanswerable Question:

Crumudgeon

Guru of the Gobblydeguk Constitutionalist
Premium
While the 92,000 is the max the unit can be loaded to, 80,000 is the max legal weight. The pup setup allows for more imprecise loading. If you want to max out a tandem van at 80,000 it has to be loaded pretty darn close to perfect.
 

steve5

Well-Known Member
Excuse me there, Wayne. I mentioned day cab, and forgot the word tandem. I will add your post about 92,000, 80,000, and 66,000 makes no sense.
Who is wayne... jk I was referring to most of our tractors out here, are 2 axle. we have 3- 3 axle tractors. Normally being used due to being autos, and newest vehicles so they are hardly ever available. So the 66000 lbs is all you can carry on a 51 series and a 2 axle tractor. With that same tractor, 80,000 lbs is what you can haul on a set. 92,000 is what all combined axles on a 2 axle tractor and a set of pups can handle, although the gross weight isn't legal, and i guess, shouldn't have put that in hindsight, sorry.

Don't take offense, just giving more info for OP to answer his Unanswerable Question.
 

maxicoze

Active Member
We're talking a lot about weight lately:

You know, and i know that in LTL we cube out before we weigh out. We rarely get up to 80,000 a night. Not even close.

Or maybe i'm missing something? Maybe this is just a division one (northeast) thing?

Remember, the question is mostly for niteliner runs where you go from your terminal to a hub and then come directly back to your terminal. Although, i think this question could apply to ALL road operations.

Question STILL remains unanswered.
 

maxicoze

Active Member
Then the whole forum is pointless and it’s obvious that no one on corporate level cares but the point of the forum is to have open discussions about various topics and ideas wether it makes any difference or not.

i was thinking about this yesterday. i think the problem is, not just in LTL freight, but everything----government, other industries, life itself:

Nobody knows what the F they are doing (myself included). And, nobody wants to learn or think about how to do it better. (Myself included)

The "management", while most are nice people DO NOT know what the F they are doing; They are just going with the flow and doing "what works." People with collared shirts/khakis.


Old man Cochran slept on the floor of his truck, had to pawn his watch for fuel money and had NO A/C.

Todays "managers" wouldn't know anything about that as they sit in their air conditioned offices.

This includes the Transforce know-it-alls.
 

seabreeze

Not Well Known Member, 63 Year Teamster Member
Premium
We're talking a lot about weight lately:

You know, and i know that in LTL we cube out before we weigh out. We rarely get up to 80,000 a night. Not even close.

Or maybe i'm missing something? Maybe this is just a division one (northeast) thing?

Remember, the question is mostly for niteliner runs where you go from your terminal to a hub and then come directly back to your terminal. Although, i think this question could apply to ALL road operations.

Question STILL remains unanswered.
It's been answered several times, it's just going over your head or in one ear and out the other.
 

Frootloop

Well-Known Member
If it makes you feel any better, Estes does their NiteLiner operations like this for the most part. They call them “Hub Drivers” and most of them take vans to a mini break at night on tandem axle trucks and leave back to their home domicile with a van as well. There are some that run single axles and pups but the majority run vans for the simplistic reasons we have discussed earlier.
 

maxicoze

Active Member
If it makes you feel any better, Estes does their NiteLiner operations like this for the most part. They call them “Hub Drivers” and most of them take vans to a mini break at night on tandem axle trucks and leave back to their home domicile with a van as well. There are some that run single axles and pups but the majority run vans for the simplistic reasons we have discussed earlier.

Well, that's because Estes, at least in this regard, actually uses their heads unlike "other companies......"
 

maxicoze

Active Member
1) i think we can now conclude that the question IS unanswerable.

2) The idea of using two pups to do niteliner linehaul from a terminal to a hub, and directly back is stupid.

3) Anyone who goes along with the idea, or agrees with the idea that 2 pups SHOULD be used for niteliner is STUPID.

i may likely bring this up during roadshow.
 

maxicoze

Active Member
If you hook em' right it's $50 extra bucks a night.. Stupid pays well....
i'll take 3 min hook to a van and back in bed 1-2hrs sooner over stupid any night.


Middle of the night, i just want to get my freight, get back to the barn and go home. Don't want to F around. It's stressful.
 
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