Yellow | YRC Worldwide: Shares Down After Deutsche Bank Upgrade

Freightmaster1

TB Legend
Credits
635
But rising freight prices account for only one part of the explanation as to why YRC Worldwide's shares are undervalued. In our view, the company's true potential remains largely unappreciated due to the pending labor agreement renegotiation with the Teamsters Union. The current agreement expires at the end of March next year.

Some research suggests that labor unions have lost much of their collective bargaining power over the last decade. Additionally, the U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling against collective bargaining fees applied to non-union workers dealt a to blow organized labor. President Trump even took to Twitter to praise the decision, indicating that the administration in power may not be too fond of labor unions. While this may be true, company management remains optimistic of its ability to reach and equitable agreement between the two parties.

Investors can gauge this outcome by judging from the recent labor agreement between ArcBest (ARCB) subsidiary ABF Freight and the Teamsters, which was ratified July 29th. Based on that contract, YRC's terms are likely to remain fairly unchanged except for some form of contractually obligated pay raises. The possibility of those pay raises being offset by a deal for split healthcare expenses remains unlikely. Under the current labor agreement, healthcare remains fully funded by the company at a time when the cost of healthcare continues to rise. Teamsters refused to budge on that negation with ABF in July. Nonetheless, a viable agreement is essential to both parties involved, as the stakes remain too high for the roughly 30,000 union employees to put the company's financial stability on the line.

This high dependency on union drivers is both a pain and a blessing for the company, which has benefited from having the lowest driver turnover in the industry. Drivers and dock workers have guaranteed healthcare, 401(k)s (or pensions), and competitive wages. This stability also helps relieve some of that upward wage pressure which other carriers are facing. For this reason, investors should not penalize the company as heavy as others. As mentioned earlier, the company's ability to attract 4,000 drivers so far this year should also take a little more investment risk off the table for those concerned about the pending union negotiation.

https://seekingalpha.com/article/4206227-yrc-worldwide-shares-deutsche-bank-upgrade#alt1

:bananapartyhat:
 
But rising freight prices account for only one part of the explanation as to why YRC Worldwide's shares are undervalued. In our view, the company's true potential remains largely unappreciated due to the pending labor agreement renegotiation with the Teamsters Union. The current agreement expires at the end of March next year.

Some research suggests that labor unions have lost much of their collective bargaining power over the last decade. Additionally, the U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling against collective bargaining fees applied to non-union workers dealt a to blow organized labor. President Trump even took to Twitter to praise the decision, indicating that the administration in power may not be too fond of labor unions. While this may be true, company management remains optimistic of its ability to reach and equitable agreement between the two parties.

Investors can gauge this outcome by judging from the recent labor agreement between ArcBest (ARCB) subsidiary ABF Freight and the Teamsters, which was ratified July 29th. Based on that contract, YRC's terms are likely to remain fairly unchanged except for some form of contractually obligated pay raises. The possibility of those pay raises being offset by a deal for split healthcare expenses remains unlikely. Under the current labor agreement, healthcare remains fully funded by the company at a time when the cost of healthcare continues to rise. Teamsters refused to budge on that negation with ABF in July. Nonetheless, a viable agreement is essential to both parties involved, as the stakes remain too high for the roughly 30,000 union employees to put the company's financial stability on the line.

This high dependency on union drivers is both a pain and a blessing for the company, which has benefited from having the lowest driver turnover in the industry. Drivers and dock workers have guaranteed healthcare, 401(k)s (or pensions), and competitive wages. This stability also helps relieve some of that upward wage pressure which other carriers are facing. For this reason, investors should not penalize the company as heavy as others. As mentioned earlier, the company's ability to attract 4,000 drivers so far this year should also take a little more investment risk off the table for those concerned about the pending union negotiation.

https://seekingalpha.com/article/4206227-yrc-worldwide-shares-deutsche-bank-upgrade#alt1

:bananapartyhat:
 
But rising freight prices account for only one part of the explanation as to why YRC Worldwide's shares are undervalued. In our view, the company's true potential remains largely unappreciated due to the pending labor agreement renegotiation with the Teamsters Union. The current agreement expires at the end of March next year.

Some research suggests that labor unions have lost much of their collective bargaining power over the last decade. Additionally, the U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling against collective bargaining fees applied to non-union workers dealt a to blow organized labor. President Trump even took to Twitter to praise the decision, indicating that the administration in power may not be too fond of labor unions. While this may be true, company management remains optimistic of its ability to reach and equitable agreement between the two parties.

Investors can gauge this outcome by judging from the recent labor agreement between ArcBest (ARCB) subsidiary ABF Freight and the Teamsters, which was ratified July 29th. Based on that contract, YRC's terms are likely to remain fairly unchanged except for some form of contractually obligated pay raises. The possibility of those pay raises being offset by a deal for split healthcare expenses remains unlikely. Under the current labor agreement, healthcare remains fully funded by the company at a time when the cost of healthcare continues to rise. Teamsters refused to budge on that negation with ABF in July. Nonetheless, a viable agreement is essential to both parties involved, as the stakes remain too high for the roughly 30,000 union employees to put the company's financial stability on the line.

This high dependency on union drivers is both a pain and a blessing for the company, which has benefited from having the lowest driver turnover in the industry. Drivers and dock workers have guaranteed healthcare, 401(k)s (or pensions), and competitive wages. This stability also helps relieve some of that upward wage pressure which other carriers are facing. For this reason, investors should not penalize the company as heavy as others. As mentioned earlier, the company's ability to attract 4,000 drivers so far this year should also take a little more investment risk off the table for those concerned about the pending union negotiation.

https://seekingalpha.com/article/4206227-yrc-worldwide-shares-deutsche-bank-upgrade#alt1

:bananapartyhat:
The author of this really needs to get out and have a discussion with labor. I think the anger amongst rank and file is greatly underestimated, we'll see if results in no votes though.
 
But rising freight prices account for only one part of the explanation as to why YRC Worldwide's shares are undervalued. In our view, the company's true potential remains largely unappreciated due to the pending labor agreement renegotiation with the Teamsters Union. The current agreement expires at the end of March next year.

Some research suggests that labor unions have lost much of their collective bargaining power over the last decade. Additionally, the U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling against collective bargaining fees applied to non-union workers dealt a to blow organized labor. President Trump even took to Twitter to praise the decision, indicating that the administration in power may not be too fond of labor unions. While this may be true, company management remains optimistic of its ability to reach and equitable agreement between the two parties.

Investors can gauge this outcome by judging from the recent labor agreement between ArcBest (ARCB) subsidiary ABF Freight and the Teamsters, which was ratified July 29th. Based on that contract, YRC's terms are likely to remain fairly unchanged except for some form of contractually obligated pay raises. The possibility of those pay raises being offset by a deal for split healthcare expenses remains unlikely. Under the current labor agreement, healthcare remains fully funded by the company at a time when the cost of healthcare continues to rise. Teamsters refused to budge on that negation with ABF in July. Nonetheless, a viable agreement is essential to both parties involved, as the stakes remain too high for the roughly 30,000 union employees to put the company's financial stability on the line.

This high dependency on union drivers is both a pain and a blessing for the company, which has benefited from having the lowest driver turnover in the industry. Drivers and dock workers have guaranteed healthcare, 401(k)s (or pensions), and competitive wages. This stability also helps relieve some of that upward wage pressure which other carriers are facing. For this reason, investors should not penalize the company as heavy as others. As mentioned earlier, the company's ability to attract 4,000 drivers so far this year should also take a little more investment risk off the table for those concerned about the pending union negotiation.

https://seekingalpha.com/article/4206227-yrc-worldwide-shares-deutsche-bank-upgrade#alt1

:bananapartyhat:
Am sure the ***** that wrote that was not informed that we have been under a concession for 10 years let me say that again 10 years. Am earning what I did in 2008. My labor is worth more than that!
 
Your labor should be near $30hr but the a holes we work that suck the co cock daily voted yes and they will do it again. Do the math 26k x 8 x 5 x 52 is a vast sum of money even at $1 an hour increase in pay. Where will the company get the extra revenue ?
They better have a plain to find the resources. Because allot of Teamsters are done being played
 
Am sure the ***** that wrote that was not informed that we have been under a concession for 10 years let me say that again 10 years. Am earning what I did in 2008. My labor is worth more than that!

Your labor should be near $30hr but the a holes we work that suck the co cock daily voted yes and they will do it again. Do the math 26k x 8 x 5 x 52 is a vast sum of money even at $1 an hour increase in pay. Where will the company get the extra revenue ?

I hate to break it to you but I have news for you two. Your labor is only worth what you agree to accept for that labor. You can kid yourself all you want with some fantasy number if it makes you feel good but you can't deny reality.
 
I hate to break it to you but I have news for you two. Your labor is only worth what you agree to accept for that labor. You can kid yourself all you want with some fantasy number if it makes you feel good but you can't deny reality.[/QUOTE majority wins when it comes to a vote that's reality. Am hoping for the best in 2019. If not I will go to plain B
 
I hate to break it to you but I have news for you two. Your labor is only worth what you agree to accept for that labor. You can kid yourself all you want with some fantasy number if it makes you feel good but you can't deny reality.
So considering $30 to be fantasy and $22 to be unacceptable, what would make Triplex check the yes box? You can talk strictly money ,or insurance, pension how ever you want to figure it.
 
So considering $30 to be fantasy and $22 to be unacceptable, what would make Triplex check the yes box? You can talk strictly money ,or insurance, pension how ever you want to figure it.

Start by rescinding all past sacrifices and the MOU. Negotiate from there with the understanding that the aforementioned expire at 23:59 on 3/31/19. It makes things simple.
 
So you vote no for anything less than full restoration? Fair enough. Something tells me Trip will not be so stringent, just guessing.

Not necessarily. It is the place to begin. Would I agree to a paltry raise based on our 15% sacrifice? No. Do I believe that returning to full contributions to CSPF is proper? No.
Do I insist on returning to the former vacation compensation package? Yes.
Do I insist on maintaining my present healthcare package? Yes. Do I believe that all who follow deserve the same compensation as do I? Yes.

These are some examples and being realistic I will accept compromise. I do know that where I believe we should start negotiations is vastly different from what the company believes.
 
A quick search revealed this article about a different vineyard:
A New Perspective on the Vineyard Labor Shortage Situation: The Case of Cain Vineyard

At Cain the full-time team of 10 people have been working in the vineyard for years, with many pruning, tending and harvesting the same rows each year. They receive benefits such as healthcare and 401k plans, have green cards and are treated with much respect.

Kudos to the vintner.
Admiration to the pickers, all ten with vast experience.
They are being compensated appropriately.

They are the cream of the crop.

I still need more specifics on their ‘total compensation package.”
 
How long will it be until some YRC executive declares that Americans just don't want to do this kind of work (freight)?

You have no idea.
We are swamped.
Cartage drivers make $17 and are content. They have no Hazmat and only straight truck license.

They’ll do the work, take more freight, show up on time, come back and reload.

They are Americans.
 
Top
AdBlock Detected