Flatbed

Discussion in 'Averitt Express' started by WarHorse, Sep 7, 2011.

  1. WarHorse

    WarHorse Member

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    Can you guys give me pros and cons on driving Flatbed for Averitt? I'm currently in Iraq but will be home by the end of the year and am looking to apply to them if it is worth my time. I'm currently driving for a OTR carrier so its not like i'm out of a job. Just looking to get better home time and equiptment along with a steady paycheck.
     
  2. ltl lifer

    ltl lifer Sr. Citizen & Gold Member

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    Haven't a clue how they operate, where they go or what they are hauling, home time, etc. See them parked on our yard periodically but that's about it. Corp will spew the propaganda about how much growth there is in flatbed but as with everything else about this outfit, it's suspect at best. Maybe on e of the drivers in that division can chime in about it.
     
  3. rnsgn

    rnsgn Member

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    People who drive flatbed seem to be like people that ride Harley's, they are hardcore for Harley's/flatbed and that's it. I'm only saying that if you are looking to change and considering AE I dont think I'd consider a job of driving flatbed for a company that's primarily a van/LTL company. Yes they have the flatbed division but for the pay (which I think is the same as a t/l van driver 41.5cpm) why put yourself out in the elements dealing with dirty/frozen tarps during winter, rain, windy days when you can drive a van, have little responsibility and scrutiny about your load being secure and you can just shut your doors and go. (Not to mention the risk of back injury, falling from all of the climbing and just being clean and comfortable vs having to shower after each time you tarp.) I'm not being critical at all, but your pay is going to be primarily for driving, why not make the rest of your job as easy as possible so you can "drive" to make the $$$. As with most carriers your pay will fluctuate weekly, you will be home every weekend, and another point is many drivers dont hire on here for the money, it's the benefits, it's descent insurance, holiday pay etc. Many carriers dont have some of the extras AE has.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 8, 2011
  4. jeepman

    jeepman Truckload Mercenary

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    +1...while Averitt has pretty nice flat beds and associated equipment, starting out in TL would be the way to go.
     
  5. WarHorse

    WarHorse Member

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    ok thanks for the advice guys...i'll look into the van side first then :)
     
  6. rnsgn

    rnsgn Member

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    Warhorse, few of us know about our flatbed division. One thing most people dont realize is while we all drive trucks that say averitt on them, each division is very different and actually operated like a separate company, therefore a guy in city knows little about how the truckload division operates, and so on. Our LTL division pays the truckload section to pull LTL loads so it is really many different operations and companies with the same name on the trucks. If I am wrong about recommending the van section I wish someone from flatbeds would give some information on how AE compares to other companies, I only know what I was told by a flatbed driver once on the fuel island and he was a bit disgruntled and that's just his opinion on that week.
     
  7. Cab Lizzard

    Cab Lizzard Well-Known Member

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    Flatbed is a whole new game no hand trucks and pallet jacks here. No HAND unloading either. Its a lot easier on the body too.
    I have had a bit of delay time getting loaded/unloaded but when they get ready it does not take long.
    Chains, binders, straps all pretty easy to use but some of the stuff you have loaded on your trailer I scratch my head and have to think a bit on how to secure the load properly. I have found that shrink wrapped skids do not go down the road well they come apart. Skids of bags have to be carefully strapped to prevent damage.
    With all of your load out their for the DOT to see they pay a bit closer attention to your choices of tying down your load. They can look very quickly at it and see if a ticket is in your future.
    After 34 years in LTL I really like the change. Oh and if you go with a company that pay's a percentage of the load you can make a pretty good dollar too.
    Permit loads are where you make the good dollar.
     
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  8. ltl lifer

    ltl lifer Sr. Citizen & Gold Member

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    Add this...with Averitt, depending on the division, you could be driving a red, white or blue tractor. Oh the variety of it all.
     
  9. rnsgn

    rnsgn Member

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    I'll agree, city work can be a little tougher on someone physically than most want, you have to be active, in and out of the truck 50 plus times a day, in and out of the trailer, moving stuff, personally it has done me well. Cab lizard what I was referring to was the icy conditions, raining, standing/climbing around on it when it gets rough outside (you know when some customer wants you to tarp the stuff he just picked up out of the mud and set on your trailer). The big comparison though is AE a company to do flatbed with, they have some tarp pay and pay .415 cents p/m, just from an outside view, if I was going to go into flatbed, I'd go with a flatbed company, one that could keep you busy during the slow times, contract changes etc, I'm not sure ae is that established in the flatbed side of things to do so.
     

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